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Sumber: New Straits Times page 20

 

 


Local retailers ready to support anti-palm oil product ban in fight against discrimination
https://themalaysianreserve.com/2019/09/10/local-retailers-ready-to-support-anti-palm-oil-product-ban-in-fight-against-discrimination/
Source: themalaysianreserve.com
 
Tuesday, September 10th, 2019 at , Economy | News
We will definitely back the law. It is only natural that we give our support to a crucial local product such as palm oil, says Chua
by ALIFAH ZAINUDDIN & SHAHEERA AZNAM SHAH/ pic by MUHD AMIN NAHARUL
LOCAL retailers pledged to remove anti-palm oil products from their grocery store shelves in a show of support for the federal government as Malaysia up its fight against “discriminatory actions” by developed nations.
The government had earlier mooted plans to set out a new law to remove products with “palm oil-free” or “no palm oil” labels found mostly at high-end stores. Local retailers, who have expressed great patriotism, said they are ready to retaliate to support domestic produces.
“We will definitely back the law. It is only natural that we give our support to a crucial local product such as palm oil. It is painted in a very negative light in Europe. We have to fight this,” Malaysia Retail Chain Association president Datuk Seri Garry Chua told The Malaysian Reserve recently.
The country’s biggest hypermarket wholesaler Mydin Mohamed Holdings Bhd had earlier removed anti-palm oil products from its stores across Malaysia — the third-largest economy in South-East Asia. MD Datuk Wira Ameer Ali Mydin said the company began removing palm oil-free items labelled last Wednesday.
“It is very important when a country itself makes a decision (and) its citizens support it. It would be very irresponsible for us not to do anything.
“By labelling products with ‘no palm oil’, you are telling consumers that palm oil is bad for you. I think this is very irresponsible for suppliers or manufacturers to do this,” he told reporters at the “Love My Palm Oil Campaign” launch for Mydin in Selangor.
Ameer Ali said anti-palm oil products at his stores are imported, but did not disclose any figures. Mydin has nearly 80 outlets nationwide and still owns premium grocer Sam’s Groceria Sdn Bhd.
Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok, who was also present at the event last week, said she hoped other retailers in the country would follow suit. Kok previously said a proposal to ban products with anti-palm oil labels is being drawn up by the Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Ministry.
In retaliation to the European Union’s (EU) sustainability stance of excluding palm oil usage as its biofuels by 2030, Indonesia has instructed its local retailers to remove all products with “palm oil-free” or “no palm oil” labels from shelves at grocery stores since August.
The world’s largest palm oil producer has been consistent in its promise of retaliatory actions against any policies that will cripple its biggest commodity export.
Malaysia and Indonesia are stiffening the moves to fight the commodity battle against some of the European countries.
According to reports, Indonesia has threatened to halt aircraft purchases from Airbus SE by its domestic carriers, higher tariffs imposed on EU dairy products and a reduced palm oil shipment to the trade bloc.
The EU has adopted a delegated act proposal that implements the Renewable Energy Directive II which will gradually limit and phase out biofuel imports into the bloc until 2030.
Malaysia and Indonesia are the world’s top producers of the commodity, supplying about 85% of global demand.
The EU countries are the second- largest buyers for both countries after India, as Europe currently consumes 7.5 million tonnes of palm oil a year — about 10% to 15% of the global palm oil demand.

 


https://www.theborneopost.com/2019/09/12/no-palm-oil-or-green-palm-oil-retailers-face-labeling-dilemma/
Source: theborneopost.com

POSTED ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2019, THURSDAY AT 12:11 AMBUSINESS


 
Malaysia and Indonesia are looking to ban goods labeled palm oil-free in retaliation against the EU restrictions and tariffs on biofuel made from palm oil. — Reuters photo

KUALA LUMPUR: Retailers in Malaysia and Indonesia should ensure shoppers can easily find foods made with sustainable palm oil, instead of refusing to stock products that steer clear of the controversial oil, environmentalists said on Tuesday.
Palm oil, the world’s most widely used edible oil, is found in everything from margarine to biscuits, and soap to soups.
But the US$60-billion global palm oil trade has been targeted by green activists for contributing to forest loss and fires, as land is cleared to plant palm trees, besides exploiting workers.
Malaysia and Indonesia – which together produce about 85 per cent of the world’s palm oil – have made moves in recent weeks to force or persuade retailers to ban products with “palm oil-free” labels to protect their key export.
“Removing palm oil-free products from the shelves won’t improve the reputation of the palm oil industry,” said Andika Putraditama, sustainable commodities and business manager at the World Resources Institute (WRI) Indonesia, a think-tank.
The European Union (EU) this year decided to phase out palm oil from renewable fuels by 2030 due to deforestation concerns.
Malaysia and Indonesia are looking to ban goods labeled palm oil-free in retaliation against the EU restrictions and tariffs on biofuel made from palm oil, said Grant Rosoman, senior campaign advisor at Greenpeace International.
But that could backfire “as consumers feel they are not being fully informed of what is in their food”, he warned.
Malaysia is considering a law banning all products that flaunt non-use of the oil, and has also launched an international offensive to polish palm oil’s image.
Paula den Hartog of the Rainforest Alliance, a US-based non-profit working on responsible business, said backing palm oil produced in line with environmental and ethical standards would be “the most constructive way forward”.
“Bans of whichever kind tend not to be effective in solving the underlying problems of deforestation, greenhouse gas emissions, land and human rights abuses often associated with palm oil production,” she added.
And switching from palm oil to other oils would not remove deforestation from supply chains, as alternatives also require land for cultivation, noted WRI’s Putraditama.
Promoting products that highlight their avoidance of palm oil, meanwhile, creates disincentives for producers who have worked to achieve sustainable certification, analysts said.
Sustainable palm oil accounts for about a fifth of global production, at an estimated 12.3 million tonnes per year, and is sold at a premium – but demand only covers about half of supply.
Late last year, the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), the industry’s watchdog, adopted a stricter set of guidelines that included a ban on cutting down forests or converting peatlands for oil palm plantations.
But growers and environmental campaigners warned the new rules would only succeed if brands and consumers bought larger amounts of oil certified as green and ethical.
Darrel Webber, chief executive of the RSPO, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation that when grown properly, oil palm can be “a very sustainable crop”.
“Instead of using palm-free labeling, we would like to see companies using the RSPO trademark … (and) see governments around the world work with each other to make sustainable palm oil the norm, whether growing it or consuming it, or both.” — Reuters

 

 


https://themalaysianreserve.com/2019/09/11/malaysias-cpo-exports-expected-to-increase/
Source: themalaysianreserve.com
 Wednesday, September 11th, 2019 at , Economy | News
by BERNAMA/ pic by TMR
MALAYSIA’S crude palm oil (CPO) exports are expected to rise this year following an expected boost in production, said Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok.
She said in the past few years, palm oil production had increased in tandem with the ever-growing global demand.
“Last year’s CPO production was about 19.5 million tonnes, of which 16.5 billion tonnes were for exports.
“Production is normally about 20 million tonnes a year, and we expect it to be slightly higher this year,” she told reporters after launching the “Love My Palm Oil” campaign wall posters at Nexus Bangsar South yesterday.
According to the Malaysian Palm Oil Board’s data, CPO production for August increased 4.64% month-on-month (MoM) to 1.82 million tonnes from 1.74 million tonnes in July, while exports grew 16.37% MoM to 1.73 million tonnes from 1.49 million tonnes previously.
Meanwhile, the country’s total palm oil inventory fell 5.3% MoM to 2.25 million tonnes in August from 2.38 million tonnes previously.
Malaysian Palm Oil Council CEO Datuk Dr Kalyana Sundram said even though CPO exports had increased, the average earnings this year were slightly lower than 2018 due to lower average CPO price.
He added that the main CPO importers are India, the European Union, China and Pakistan.
“CPO prices are increasing and we expect the trend to continue into the first quarter of 2020.
“It is currently around RM2,170 a tonne and we expect it to touch RM2,300 a tonne by December,” he added. — Bernama

 


https://themalaysianreserve.com/2019/09/11/malaysias-cpo-exports-expected-to-increase/
Source: themalaysianreserve.com
Wednesday, September 11th, 2019 at , Economy | News
by BERNAMA/ pic by TMR


MALAYSIA’S crude palm oil (CPO) exports are expected to rise this year following an expected boost in production, said Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok.
She said in the past few years, palm oil production had increased in tandem with the ever-growing global demand.
“Last year’s CPO production was about 19.5 million tonnes, of which 16.5 billion tonnes were for exports.
“Production is normally about 20 million tonnes a year, and we expect it to be slightly higher this year,” she told reporters after launching the “Love My Palm Oil” campaign wall posters at Nexus Bangsar South yesterday.
According to the Malaysian Palm Oil Board’s data, CPO production for August increased 4.64% month-on-month (MoM) to 1.82 million tonnes from 1.74 million tonnes in July, while exports grew 16.37% MoM to 1.73 million tonnes from 1.49 million tonnes previously.
Meanwhile, the country’s total palm oil inventory fell 5.3% MoM to 2.25 million tonnes in August from 2.38 million tonnes previously.
Malaysian Palm Oil Council CEO Datuk Dr Kalyana Sundram said even though CPO exports had increased, the average earnings this year were slightly lower than 2018 due to lower average CPO price.
He added that the main CPO importers are India, the European Union, China and Pakistan.
“CPO prices are increasing and we expect the trend to continue into the first quarter of 2020.
“It is currently around RM2,170 a tonne and we expect it to touch RM2,300 a tonne by December,” he added. — Bernama